Monday, November 28, 2005

Noro Fun

Last summer I found two skeins of Noro Silk Garden in the sale bin at my lys. I had always wanted to try Noro yarn, but was discouraged by the price. (I am a bargain shopper in all ways--even with the beloved yarn.) I scooped up the bargain and saved the yarn, letting it marinate until I found the perfect project. When I found Cat Bordhi, I knew those two skeins were born to be a Moebius Purl Ridge Scarf!! Well, they were born to be 98% of a Moebius Scarf, because I ran out about 3/4 way around on the I-cord BO. Argh! I was NOT gonna frog a Moebius scarf--especially my first Moebius Scarf.

I contacted my lys and of course, no more #65. I went online and found this lovely business--
Wool Needlework who had the yarn and in such a good price that I was able to buy two more skeins and have them shipped to me for way less than I could have bought them at my lys anyway. I got the yarn in days and finished the scarf and made a little pillbox to match.

Here it is...and a shot of the shaping at the top. See how cleverly I double-wrapped the lovely scarf to hide the fact that I MESSED UP AND DID A DOUBLE MOEBIUS! Oh good grief. Maybe I should have frogged.













Yep, I lost faith halfway in the first round and twisted again. Has anybody else made that mistake?

I was gonna send this to my mom, but would you send your mom a double Moebius, a defective, mutant Moebius? I think my mom deserves a perfect Moebius, just for putting up with me during my adolescences (all five of them). I am way too old for her to accept it "just cause I made it myself," like the pencil holders and Mother's Day cards and handprints squashed in clay. What to do? Do ya like it, Mom?

Anyway, I enjoyed working with the Silk Garden. It was a visual treat. I will probably do it again. Now I am making myself a cardigan with Kureyon because the other day I walked into my lcs (local craft store?) and there it was--enough Noro Kureyon in a delightful color to make me a cardigan, just for fun. As soon as I get far enough for it to have a recognizable shape, I'll post pics of the progress.

For now...
Gaelic lesson!

Figh! (knit!)--pronounced "fee"
figheadair (knitter)--pronounced "I'm not sure" (I just like it--fig*head*air)
snath (yarn & wool)--pronounced "snah" (missing an accent mark--somebody tell me how to get accent marks in!)

Lovely words all. Happy figheadh (knitting)!

Saturday, November 26, 2005

Tha i breagha an diugh, nach eil?

It's beautiful today, isn't it? (Ha i btheeyah un joo nach eyl?) Well, it is here in Tacoma!
Yesterday I would have said, "Tha i fliuch an diugh, nach eil?" or "It's wet today, isn't it?"
The past two days were good for rain (staying in and knitting), but it's good to see the blue sky today!

And this morning it's pu
mpkin pie & coffee for breakfast. Yummalicious!









I hope you all had a great Thanksgiving here in the States. We did--even watched some parade, talked with some fam back in the Southeast, & played some Christmas music (once the turkey was in the belly, that is!).

Today, much fiber fun to be had. I am writing patterns,










blocking a sweater,









working on a little Guernsey for Preston,









and trying to sneak in a few rows on
my Kureyon Kardi!









Mar sin leibh an-drasta!
(Bye for now!)

Tuesday, November 22, 2005

Farewell kid 'n' ewe

I love Bryson's "kid 'n' ewe" yarn. Unfortunately, it is going the way of Mission Falls 1824 wool & cotton (don't get me started--boohoo). It's being discontinued. Says so on the Bryson site.

I love it best for its felting qualities, like in this pair. It makes a tight, sturdy felted fabric with a boucle effect. It felts fast and shapes well. Should I go on? Maybe not, since we must mourn the loss of her--sweet kid 'n' ewe!


I have to admit to its being just a little itchy when knitted up into things like these two:













Yep, same pattern in two colors. I did secure a small amount for future use. I have enough lovely blue to design a felted vest. Wish me luck. I have never tried a felted garment--only hats , bags & slippers. Get out the calculator and cozy up to the math! (Not my nature, but I'll do anything for knitting!)

Let me hear from others of you who loved this yarn and what you did with it. Will you miss it? What will you replace it with?

And I leave you with a small Gaelic lesson...

Madainn mhath! (mah-teeyn vah)
Good morning!

Happy Wednesday and everyone have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Monday, November 21, 2005

Summer Sock School

but first...Please excuse my wonderful first-born daughter's overly enthusiastic, but naive comment...this is probably the first knitting blog she's ever seen. I am proud to say that she does knit (and crochet) and is even knitting a scarf for her "little" sister.

Now, on to the sock content. Yippee! Here's the gist. My husband and I took a trip this past summer back to our beloved Southeast to see friends & fam. Of course, I took sock projects, as they are easy to transport and easy to work on while enduring air travel. My goal was to learn socks on 2 circs and the ML . I had tried to do ML to no avail the previous summer. The bridge between dpn & ML was Socks Soar on Two Circular Needles . Once I got the 2 circs down, the ML made perfect sense! Cat Bordhi is a wonderful teacher--even by book!

After knitting about a dozen of these









with the technique I learned from Big Book of Knitting by Katharina Buss (from which I also learned mittens and gloves and am forever grateful), I found Folk Socks by Nancy Bush, well-known Sock Goddess. That's when I discovered that (uh-yeah) there are way more ways to make socks than what I thought!

The first project I latched onto from Nancy Bush's book was the Welsh Country Stockings. The only problem is that I chose a yarn too heavy for the project (Patons Classic Wool) and am STILL working on them. At least I was able to transfer the project to 2 circs instead of wrestling with the dpn.










I will be able to mount leather bottoms on these monsters for the Fred to use as slippers! They could be oven mitts, for sheep's sake!

Anyway, back to the past summer. I had the first of a pair of socks on the dpn with Lion Brand Magic Stripes in this lovely blue/green/tan/white colorway. (I know, I'm a yarn snob, too, but this yarn makes good, sturdy, warm socks.) I finished the first one up with dpn, and then made the second one on 2 circs. CAUTION: DON'T DO THAT!

Here's the result.










The dpn one is bigger, because apparently, everyone tends to knit tighter on 2 circs. Lesson learned. BUT. Then I thought I'd find more of the yarn and try to make each misfit its mate. No. The yarn changed. I like the new almost better, but I won't be able to rectify my foible.

See--









the new version is more heathery--pretty, but no match. The first wonky pair will just be mine, and I'll probably finish the new pair (on dpn--which I still love as much as ever) for the afore-mentioned mom-promoting first-born (but don't tell--shhhhh).

Okay, enough sock talk for now. I leave you with some hazy, sexy sock yarn porn










Yes, I get to do more of the lovely Mountain Colors in Alpine & Moon Dance, CTH Supersock in Quarry Hill; try some Frog Tree Alpaca Fingering, Brown Sheep Wildfoote in Rhapsody, Cascade Sassy Stripes, and two obviously handwound balls in front-- Lorna's Laces Shepherd Sock in Water Color.

Some of it will be going to testers for 2006 sock patterns, but it's all mine to look at and dream about for now!

More sock fun to come! Happy Monday to all!

Sunday, November 20, 2005

Failte!

Welcome to my first post! Please excuse my lack of accent marks--much to learn. I wanted to create a blog to send out news and musings about Figheadh and knitting in general. As we tell on our site, figheadh means knitting in Scottish Gaelic. Cniotail is Irish Gaelic, so ,yes, there is a difference...but not so huge.

As must be obvious, we latched onto the Scottish version and then it was all about the FIG. The Scots would not say "fig head". They would say "fee-yugh" (the "ugh" sounding the same as your response to seeing a squashed slug on the sidewalk--as you suppress upchuck, that is, as says our Gaelic teacher, the illustrious Richard of Slighe nan Gaidheal).

So...

figknits is me

and the fig



and the figheadh



Mar sin leibh an drasta!
(Farewell for now!)